“Never let the future disturb you. You will meet it, if you have to, with the same weapons of reason which today arm you against the present.”

– Marcus Aurelius

“Never let the future disturb you. You will meet it, if you have to, with the same weapons of reason which today arm you against the present.”

– Marcus Aurelius

When can the police search your car?

On Behalf of | Dec 11, 2023 | Firm News

You could be pulled over by the police for a traffic violation. The police may ask you if they can search your car. Your car is as much of a private space as your home, so having the police search your car may feel like a violation of your privacy. 

Under the Fourth Amendment, you have protections against unreasonable search and seizures. In other words, the police must have reasons to search your vehicle. If the police insist they need to search your car, it can help to learn when they can legally do this. Here’s what you should know: 

Did the police have a warrant?

The police may have a warrant that permits them to search your car. The police would have to get the warrant from a judge and present a reason the search is necessary. However, the police can do warrantless searches on vehicles for several reasons.  

Did you give the police permission?

You could simply give permission to the police to search your vehicle. But, you can also refuse to allow the search to happen. If the police continue to search the vehicle without permission, evidence gathered this way could be excluded from a court case.

Did the police have probable cause?

Before a vehicle is pulled over, the police should have reasonable suspicion that a crime was committed, such as the driver running a red light or missing a taillight, but this doesn’t give them the broad right to search a vehicle. The police may need to have probable cause, which is substantial evidence a crime was committed. Probable cause can lead to a vehicle search, such as if the police noticed an open bottle of alcohol in the vehicle.

If the police search your car without having your consent, a warrant or probable cause, they may have abused their power and violated your constitutional rights. If you believe your legal rights have been violated, then it can help to learn about your defense options.